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Today’s Interview with the New York Parrot Literary Magazine

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Thank you Dustin Pickering and Mutiu Olawuyi for listening.  Hence caring.  We need more like you in this world of ours.

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A review of my book CHRONIC CREATIVITY

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by founder of Creativity Portal

Chris Dunmire January 4, 2009 at 12:21 PM

“When Angela Mack first approached me in late 2004 with her Chronic Creativity excerpts, I found her ingenious way of describing the condition Chronic Creativity in diagnostic terms metaphorically apt.

It didn’t take long into reading about the first symptom, Claustrophobia, that I realized Angela possessed a perspective on “being perpetually creative” that I identified with. She gave the state of creative lucidity I’ve been experiencing almost daily since I left my corporate job in 2000 a name that fit so well: Chronic Creativity.

I found each of Angela’s subsequent Chronic Creativity excerpts not only engaging, but also insightful. As an accomplished teacher, musician, composer, and artist, Angela writes from a place of living the dynamic creative mind, and witnessing its fruit in those she guides. Her enthusiasm is contagious, to say the least.

So many ideas and much discussion can come out of Angela’s Chronic Creativity excerpts. Not wanting to miss out on an opportunity to express my own thoughts, I’ll note my impressions on Creative Slush as each excerpt is published on the Creativity Portal. “

–Chris Dunmire, founder of Creativity Portal taken from
http://www.chrisdunmire.com/tidbits/mack/cc.intro.shtml

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Dear Wisconsin, Why the Arts?

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by Angie Mack Reilly written in January 2019 and published on 8.8.20

Especially In this age of artificial intelligence (AI), we need to take another look at the universal language of music. It is an essential component to any culture. The question is, will we embrace all that the gift of music has to offer?

I often tell my private music students that singing and playing an instrument is a sport. I know that, in Wisconsin, we value sports. Musicianship requires rigorous training and mastery over the muscles involved. Because of that, it is considered a “discipline” which takes patience and time. I consider myself a “personal trainer” for musicians of all ages.

After working with thousands of youth over past few decades, I am very concerned that our children are not expressing themselves and innovating as much as they are capable of. “The screens” are robbing them of these two very essential components. Weekly music lessons keep that creative expression alive and spark innovation. Our children are going to have to compete with artificial intelligence (AI). How will they do that? With creative communication, expression, intuition and innovation.

I am the most passionate about people coming together to creatively collaborate. The acronym for team is “together everyone achieves more”. That is why I am involved with so many different music events. Music events create a sense of belonging and are vital for the good health of any culture. Simply put, music events improve our quality of life in Ozaukee County and give us a sense of community.

On the morning of January 10, the cast and crew of NSAA’s Elf Jr. will be featured on Real Milwaukee with Brian Kramp of Fox 6 . Children will get to experience first-hand why improvisation and confidence are essential skills in the television industry.

My wish for 2019 would be to see more financial resources thrown at cultural offerings and arts events particularly in Grafton where I live. This is why Ozaukee Talent has become a fiscal receiver through Arts Wisconsin. We need benefactors who can donate to keep the arts alive and thriving.

There needs to be a way for funds to trickle down to the artists themselves. Sadly, this is not happening in our county as much as it should be. The arts scene in Grafton is struggling. I dream of a day when artists and musicians can be adequately compensated for their contributions. I applaud Cedarburg for how much they value the arts with their dollars. In my opinion, this directly results in educational, economic and cultural success.

Can I be frank and say that kids who grow up with the arts as a vital part of their upbringing do not grow up and shoot other people? There is a cure for mass violence. It’s a preventative cure and it’s called the arts. The arts industry naturally teaches an awareness and appreciation for human life and the human experience.

Isolation and disconnect make emotional and mental imbalances even worse. I have used the arts my entire life as a means of coping with childhood trauma and combating depression and anxiety. Socializing and connecting with others does not come naturally to me. I have to work really hard at it. The bulk of my friendships began while working on arts projects with others. The arts provide a place of belonging. The arts can help re-wire a traumatized brain and provide a place of human connection which is also known to help with addiction.

Pure and simple. We need to get busy mentoring the next generation in the arts. And Wisconsin communities need to be financially and generously supportive. Innovation and creative communication need more priority and respect in the business world.

FOR CONSULTING, WORKSHOPS AND SPEAKING: angie@ozaukeetalent.com

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“Just Talking: A Chat With Angie Mack Reilly 2.29.20” Ben Merens and Riverwest Radio

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The Girl With the Colorful Mind

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The Girl with the Colorful Mind

(c) 2004 Anglea K. Mack

Photo by Angie Mack Reilly

Joy was playing in the corner. She loved the fresh smell of wood in the woodworking station in Mrs. Garphy’s kindergarten room. She especially enjoyed that particular spot because it was quiet. Other than the music corner, it was the only place in the room that made any sense to her. The corner enabled her to think, to feel, and to be her own person. The other children usually preferred the train station, the housekeeping station, and the painting station which left the woodworking station to be a place of solitude. It was a place where she could explore with her hands and her mind as she whistled like her father.

“Joy, it’s time to clean up and come over to the art table. We are going to work on our Christmas crafts”, said plump Mrs. Garphy in her soft “teacher” voice. “I hate the art table,” thought Joy as she smelled each piece of smooth wood before dropping it into the yellow bin. She heard a lot of noise in the room. As she looked behind her, the other children were cleaning their stations as well. Marcie was cleaning up the housekeeping station. No, she was actually bossing the other children to clean up for her. “Look at Marcie,” murmured Joy. “She thinks she is so great because she has long shiny blond hair. She always has to be the mom.”

Joy hated the housekeeping station. She hated being bossed by Marcie. Joy played in there once, but never again after being told by Marcie that she had to be the “baby brother” while the other children laughed. Joy was the only girl in the room who didn’t have long hair. Her hair was different. It was black, short, and kinky. Her skin was also dark brown. She was the only brown-skinned girl in kindergarten.

When Joy and the other children finished cleaning up their stations, they walked over to the art table. Joy found a spot on the end away from anybody else. Immediately, she saw a Styrofoam plate with little pieces of red, black, and white felt. Next to that, was a plate full of glue with a Popsicle stick. Joy raised her hand. “Mrs. Garphy, what are we making?” Tying a smock around Bobby, Mrs. Garphy answered, “We are making our special Christmas gifts to bring home.”

Joy was really excited. She wondered if they were going to make Christmas stockings. Then Joy glanced over at Marcie who was whispering into Becky’s ear, looking at Joy, and laughing. Joy quickly looked back down at her art supplies. “Why is she so mean? Doesn’t she know that I could whoop her butt anyway?” Joy asked herself.

As Joy looked up to find Mrs. Garphy, she saw the funniest thing ever. Mrs. Garphy was carrying empty roles of toilet paper in her arms and under her double chin which made her look like she had a triple chin. Joy burst out laughing hysterically. “Mrs. Garphy has toilet paper rolls!” she blurted to the classroom. The other children slowly joined her with their tiny giggles. Joy was laughing so hard that she had her hands on her belly, her head tilted back, and both legs up in the air. In fact, she had to keep herself from falling backwards in her chair. “These are for our special Christmas project,” commanded the now stern Mrs. Garphy.

“Christmas project? HA! HA! HA!” Now Joy was really making a scene. Somehow, the sacredness of Christmas and the ordinary item used to wipe butts seemed like a funny contradiction to her. She couldn’t help from laughing. It was just too funny. It was just too unreal for her to grasp. “Mrs. Garphy must be playing a joke!” she shouted. But as she glanced up at Mrs. Garphy, Mrs. Garphy didn’t have a “joking face” on. She had a mean face. That mean face was glaring down at Joy. “Joy, I want you to go sit in the hallway immediately.”

Joy went out to sit on the cold marble hallway floor outside of the classroom. She hated the brown speckled floor. As she observed the floor, she noticed how dirty it was and began to scribble in its dirt. She felt really sorry. She didn’t mean to get into trouble. She wondered if, like Marcie and the other children, Mrs. Garphy hated her, too.

Joy started to get a pain in her stomach and held it tightly. She really wanted to go home. She thought about playing in her neighborhood with her other friends who looked and acted a lot more like Joy than the children in the suburban school. Joy thought about how she played jump rope with Tisha and Natasia just the day before. Joy began to rap their favorite jump rope song, “Donald Duck is a one-legged, one-legged, one-legged animal. Donald Duck is a two-legged, two-legged, two-legged animal…..” She hit her hands on the cold marble floor as she sang. She noticed how when she slapped the floor, it made a nice high-pitched drum sound. Then she looked up at the classroom door that was shut. She wanted to bang on the door to see how it sounded. But she restrained herself.

Suddenly, Mrs. Garphy opened the classroom door. “Are you ready to do your art project now?” she asked.

Joy answered an obedient, “yes”.

When Joy walked into the classroom, she saw a little Santa shaped like a toilet paper roll. She really wanted to giggle but instead she bit her lip as hard as she could. Joy dutifully made her toilet paper Santa with her plate of felt and her glue. She topped it off with a cotton ball beard and set it to dry.

Next, it was music time. This thrilled Joy tremendously. She loved to sit right next to the piano and sing. However, she didn’t like looking at Mrs. Garphy’s big bottom in her brown polyester pants as she sat on the bench to play. They sang “I’m a little teapot”, complete with hand motions. Then they sang “Where is Thumkin?” Joy liked that song. She loved putting her fingers behind her back only to bring each finger in front of her at the appointed time. Joy pleaded, “Mrs. Garphy, can we sing it again?”

“Of course!” she answered.

Joy held both hands behind her back. As she eagerly waited, she felt a hard tug on her hair. “Ouch!” she whispered and turned around. It was Marcie. “You’re stupid”, whispered Marcie. “You stink, too!” Joy tried to ignore her. As Mrs. Garphy played the piano with her back away from the children, Joy decided to handle Marcie on her own by ignoring her. Marcie continued to poke Joy in the back. “Nobody wants you here”, whispered Marcie. “You don’t belong here.” Even though Marcie’s poking hurt Joy’s back, Joy continued to ignore her. Marcie started to kick Joy. “Everybody hates you! You’re black!”

Just then, Joy felt something like a fire burn inside of her belly. She was angry. She was so angry that she wanted to stand up and punch Marcie in the face. But, instead, she closed her eyes. She began to sing to herself, “I feel red, so red. I’m mad and my mind is red.” She hummed the tune that immediately popped into her mind. Then Joy thought about Marcie bossing everybody in housekeeping and how she was envious of her long blonde hair. With the same melody she sang, “I feel green, so green. I’m jealous and my mind is green.” Continuing with her eyes closed and shutting out everything and everyone around her, she thought about being in the hallway and how rejected she felt. She sang, “I feel brown, so brown. Nobody loves me and I feel so brown”. At this point, Joy was in some other realm. She was completely oblivious to her surroundings. With her eyes closed, she hummed and sang the lyrics in her head, “I feel light blue, so light blue, when I do what I like to do. I feel yellow, so yellow. When I’m happy I feel so yellow. I feel white, so white. When I obey I feel so white”.

By this time, all of the children and Mrs. Garphy were staring at Joy. Joy finished her song in her head and then opened her eyes. Even Marcie was still. Everybody was still and staring. Mrs. Garphy broke the silence, “What are you singing, Joy?”

Joy answered, “It’s nothing….just a song in my mind.”

“Can we hear it?” asked Mrs. Garphy.

A confidence swept over Joy. “Yes, you may.” She stood up, cleared her throat, and sang:
“I feel red, so red. I’m mad and my mind is red.
I feel green, so green. I’m jealous and my mind is green.
I feel brown, so brown. Nobody loves me and I feel brown.
I feel light blue, so light blue. When I do what I like to do.
I feel yellow, so yellow. When I’m happy I feel so yellow.
I feel white, so white. When I obey I feel so white.”

Mrs. Garphy and rest of the children (besides Marcie) stood up and clapped. “What a talent!” Mrs. Garphy boasted. “Joy, we are so happy to have you. Thank you for sharing with us your colorful mind.”

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Chronic Creativity Public Art

Rocking the Chairs in Grafton

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Digital Art by Angie Mack Reilly 9.9.19

More Photos

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Ozaukee Press Article About Angie’s Award Winning Poems

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Angie’s Playlist

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Need a playlist for a party?  Something to stimulate your creativity?  Something to unwind to?

 

Listen to Angie’s Playlist

“Not For Your Average Joe”

while browsing through inspirational pins about Chronic Creativity

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My Dream Home

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by Angie Mack Reilly 7.20.19

The Art of Dreaming

I believe that dreaming is an underrated skill.

Not the sleep kind of dreaming.

But daydreaming.

Dreaming gives us hope.

I see dreaming as a coping skill.

I see it as being visionary.

Being visionary is a skill that any good leader needs to have.

I encourage dreaming.   Fantasy.  Fiction.  And everything in between.

Featured image taken by Angie Mack Reilly titled, “Sunset on the Wisconsin Farm”

Follow My Chronic Creativity Pinterest Board below!

Angie’s Dream Home

Design concepts are open, natural, creative and aesthetic.   Free flowing.  Like my soul.

Daydream A Piano Original By Angie Mack Reilly (c) 2017 by Live from the Grafton House of Blues

Poem:  America is Coming Home Again

Poem:  Inward and Outward

43.3210491-87.9627597
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Angie Mack Reilly: Public Speaking Resume (now booking)

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CONTACT:  angie@ozaukeetalent.com

“Angela is a passionate visionary who has the ability to articulate, set and attain high goals for a greater cause.”  -Michael “Hawkeye” Herman, international music educator,  keynote speaker and performer

Angie Mack Reilly

Grafton, WI • 262.309.4112• angie@ozaukeetalent.com

Public Speaker | Writer | Musician | Composer | Producer, Director, Marketing Professional 

Innovative Public Speaker and natural leader with a passion for the arts community and issues effecting women and the mentally ill. Proven effective transforming environments to create lasting change using the arts and creativity. Background in marketing with success linking businesses with needed resources to provide mutually positive opportunities and revenue streams.

Technical Proficiencies: Social Media, Music Production, WordPress, eCommerce, Sound Equipment, Recording Equipment, PC, Mac, Microsoft Office.

Listen to Recent Podcast Where Angie is Featured by The World Music Foundation

Topics of Expertise

Creating a Culture of Innovation and Teamwork

Transforming Work Environments into Creative Hubs

The Importance of Business Mentors in the Arts

Managing Teams “Theater Style”

Moving Audiences and Tips from a Theater Director

Public Speaking Engagements

  •  See television and radio appearances below

  • Vast amount of experience speaking as a theater director and actor for 18+ years

  • “Listen to Your Mother” National Show on Motherhood

  • Chronic Creativity Interactive Workshops at Spirit Life Church in Mequon

  • Walk of Fame Induction Ceremony”, Grafton, WI as Chairperson about blues history

  • “Giro d’ Grafton Bike Race, 2007, Grafton, WI

  • “Wisconsin Blues Connection” and PowerPoint Presentation, Wisconsin Historical Society

  • “At 10” Radio Interview, National Public Radio

  • “Paramount History” and PowerPoint Presentation, Port Washington Kiwanas Club

  • “Paramount History” and PowerPoint Presentation, MATC-Mequon Campus

  • “Passionate about Paramount and the Blues” Children’s Educational Performance, Grafton Library 2006

  • “Paramount Blues Festival Panel Discussion”, Cedarburg Cultural Center WI

  • St. Mary’s Care Center Chapel Services, Madison, WI

Television, Acting and Production Career

  • Played supporting actress, Carol, in Leaving Eden Series

  • Produced and stared as lead female, Golde, Fiddler on the Roof, Next Act Theatre

  • Produced and acted as supporting female lead, Motormouth Maybelle, Hairspray, Cedarburg Performing Arts Center (CPAC)

  • Produced and played female lead Narrator, Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat, CPAC

  • Produced and starred as supporting lead, John the Baptist and female soloist for Godspell, NSAA

  • Produced and directed hundreds of musical theater productions and events throughout southeastern Wisconsin primarily at the Cedarburg Performing Arts Center, The North Shore Academy of the Arts, Next Act Theater, Schauer Arts and Activities Center, Spirit Life Church, Cedar Creek Settlement, Ozaukee Christian School, The Joseph and Rebecca Peltz Center for Jewish Life.

  • 2018:  Television feature on the Real Milwaukee show with Brian Kramp about children’s theater

  • 2018:  Television feature on CBS 58 with Michael Schlesinger about children’s theater

  • 2017:  Juried Public Speaker for National Listen to Your Mother Show about mental illness

  • 2016:  Television feature on the Morning Blend Show about mental illness

  • 2016:  Television feature on the Morning Blend Show about gifted and talented children

  • 2009:  Television feature on My Fox about Wisconsin music history

Writing Career

  • Authored three published books titled Be True, Be Free, and Chronic Creativity.

  • Created written content for the following major projects:

  • “Grafton City Blues” by Kevin Ramsey, Milwaukee Repertory Theater

  • “Lost Musical Treasure” PBS History Detectives

  • The Rise & Fall of Paramount Records, Volume One (6 LP 180g) …. Grammy Award Winner, 2014 – Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package …. Label: Third Man Records;

  • The Rise & Fall of Paramount Records, Volume Two (6 LP 180g) …. Grammy Award Winner, 2015 – Best Boxed or Special Limited-Edition Package …. Label: Third Man Records; “Chasin’ Dem Blues” by Kevin Ramsey, Delaware Theatre Company

  • “Paramount Walking Tour Booklet”, Village of Grafton Historic Preservation Commission

  • “Substance Abuse: The Ultimate Teen Guide (It Happened to Me)” by Sheri Bestor

  • “Paramount Walking Tour Booklet”, Village of Grafton Historic Preservation Commission

  • Wrote journalistic articles for magazines and blogs:

  • “Cedarburg’s Rising Star” Ozaukee Magazine, Apr 2014

  • “On the Trail of Bluesman Blind Blake in Milwaukee” OnMilwaukee.com Apr 2011

  • “Chronic Creativity” Creativity Portal

  • “Why the Blues Belongs in Port” Ozaukee Magazine, Mar 2015

  • “The Adventures of Tim and Ben” Ozaukee Magazine, Jun 2014

  • “Eurydice” Ozaukee Magazine, Aug 2014

  • North Shore Academy of the Arts Website Blog, Main Writer, 2007-2013

  • Ozaukee Talent Website Blog, Main Writer and Web Owner, 2016

  • Sociofocus Website Blog, Main Writer and Web Owner, 2010-2016

  • Paramounts Home, Article Contributor and Web Owner, 2004-2016

  • Creative Connection Arts, Contributor and Web Owner, 2004-2011

  • Milwaukee Talent Website Blog, Main Writer and Web Owner, 2016

  • “The Value of An Idea”, Creativity Portal

Career Accomplishments

  • 1997- Present Lifetime arts and entertainment industry career has consisted of effectively reaching audiences on a regular and weekly basis.

  • 1997- Present Guest Performer (Singer/Songwriter) at hundreds of special events over the years.

  • Boosted Ozaukee County tourism by pitching a new music theme leading to the Paramount Plaza redevelopment design in Grafton, Wisconsin.

  • Pitched a show to PBS History Detectives resulting in the nationally aired segment, “Lost Musical Treasures” on the music history of Ozaukee County.

  • Assisted Playwright Kevin Ramsey as a Blues History Consultant for the musicals “Grafton City Blues” and “Chasin’ Dem Blues”.

  • Collaborated with Grafton Area Jaycees to launch an annual blues festival that has been ongoing and successful since 2005 raising blues awareness and bringing tourism.

  • 2005-Present Expertise as in arts leadership and pre-war blues history has led to being interviewed by various international and national publications such as Blues and Rhythm Magazine, The New York Times, Blues Festival Guide, American Profile Magazine, Blues and Soul Records Magazine. Appearances also in several award-winning books as a blues expert such as Do Not Sell at Any Price by Amanda Petrusich and New Paramount Book of Blues by Alex van der Tuuk. Angie has also been quoted in many written news publications throughout Wisconsin as they relate to blues history, marketing and the arts.

Additional Experience

Ozaukee Talent, Grafton, WI, (2016 – Present)

Founding Director/CEO

Discover musical and artistic talent within individuals with diverse skillsets working independently through lessons, coaching, and connecting resources to link individuals into the arts community. Collaborate with industry leaders locally and throughout the United States and provide expert advice to clients. Teach music lessons, direct and produce plays, and participate in public speaking engagements to educate the community on current issues. Advocate for arts education and growth within the area. Network on all Social Media platforms including Facebook, LinkedIn, Blogs, Pinterest, Snapchat, websites, twitter, YouTube, etc.

Northshore Academy of Arts, Inc, Grafton, WI, (2004 – Present)

Performing Arts Expert | Visiting Music Director | Teacher | Marketing Director

Developed strategic marketing plans to reach multi-child families in Southeastern WI. Created all social media accounts, handled public relations with area businesses, and gave detailed marketing and analytic reports to the Board of Directors. Managed marketing volunteers. Produce and direct plays and teach performance art and music classes to all age groups.

Key Contributions:

  • Increased community arts education and knowledge of programs through various marketing and branding techniques.

  • Built valuable relationships and increased organization Public Relations (PR).

Paramount Records and Blues Educator, Advocate and Researcher, Grafton, WI, (2004 – Present)

Co-Founder/Researcher/Educator

Developed a community historical resource researching and analyzing musical history in the area and awakening tourism to provide a new outlet to bring in visitors. Discovered lost history and encouraged community partnerships to assist all businesses in the area.

Key Contributions:

  • Revealed the unmarked burial place of legendary musician Blind Blake and raised funds to have his graved marked.

  • Awakened a legendary history of blues artist that had been forgotten in the area.

Marcus Promotions/Footlights, Inc., Milwaukee, WI, (2013 – 2015)

Account Executive/Marketing Consultant

Strategically partnered businesses with productions and theater venues building Business to Business (B2B) type sales relationships for mutually benefiting parties. Handled large key accounts with clients including Milwaukee Public Television, Habush Habush and Rottier, The Trinity Irish Dancers, Roundys, etc.

Key Contributions:

  • Boosted company revenue through strategic processes and teamwork.

  • Secured several key accounts creating lasting business relationships.